FENCING TERMS QUIZ ANSWERS


How well do you know fencing terms? Our quiz starts out easy and ramps up as you keep going. We’ve included questions about some of the most common terms, as well as some of the most misused terms in the fencing community. How familiar are you with the terms of the great sport of fencing?

Below are all the answers with more detailed explanations for each question. If you haven't taken the quiz yet, read no further and click here to go back to the original article.

1. What is the french (and commonly used) word for the area where fencing play happens?

  • Piste
  • Court
  • Rink
  • Pitch

Explanation: French for ‘track’, piste is a commonly used term to describe the area where fencing happens. Strip is another common term.

 

2. What is the basic forward movement from En Garde position?

  • Recover
  • Retreat
  • Lunge
  • Advance

Explanation: The basic movement forward from the En Garde position is called an advance.

 

3. Which of the following is NOT a modern fencing weapon?

  • Saber
  • Rapier
  • Foil
  • Epee

Explanation: The three modern fencing weapons are Saber, Epee, and Foil.

 

4. Choose the best definition for Right-of-Way in fencing.

  • Is only awarded in overtime to determine outcome in case of a tie
  • Is used to determine which car may progress from a four-way stop first
  • Is a term used to describe the correct call
  • Is given to the fencer that initiates their attack first

Explanation: Right-of-Way is given to the fencer that begins their attack before their opponent.

 

5. Before and after every bout a the referee requires fencers to:

  • Celebrate
  • Salute
  • Write down the score
  • Check their equipment to ensure it’s working

Explanation: Saluting is the only requirement here both before and after a bout. The referee will require fencers to check their equipment before a bout, and the referee themselves will write down the score after a bout.

6. The trio of wires that runs under a fencer’s jacket to be used with a scoring machine is called the:

  • French Grip
  • Body Cord
  • Head Cord
  • Lamé

Explanation: The wires that run under a fencer’s jacket is collectively called the body cord.

 

7. In which modern fencing weapon is it NOT required to hit with the point?

  • Saber
  • Epee
  • Foil
  • Rapier

Explanation: The saber is the only modern fencing weapon where hitting with the point is not required.

 

8. What is the head protection that fencer use called?

  • Veil
  • Mask
  • Hood
  • Helmet

Explanation: Because a fencer’s head protection only covers the front of the fencer’s face, the head protection is called a mask.

 

9. In Which weapon is it common for the referee not to keep time during the fencing periods?

  • Foil
  • Saber
  • Epee
  • Rapier

Explanation: Fencing play is made up of distinct 3-minute periods. Due to saber's faster pace (and given the fact that almost no bouts go that long), referees often do not keep time, even at major events such as world cups and national championships.

 

10. What is the function of a red card?

  • For the most serious offenses during a competition. This card means expulsion from one or more tournaments.
  • The smallest infraction. Two red cards will grant a Yellow Card to the fencer.
  • For moderate offenses or repeated small offenses. A red card awards a point for the fencer’s opponent.
  • A small rule violation. Two red cards will grant a point to an opposing fencer.

Explanation: A red card (not to be confused with a group III red card), is given when a fencer performs a moderate offense, or when a fencer repeatedly performs small offenses. A red card awards a point to the offending fencer’s opponent.

 

11. What is NOT a component of an electrical fencing strip?

 

  • Reel
  • Scoring box
  • Bayonet plug
  • Two-meter warning lines

Explanation: A bayonet plug is the name for a type of body cord used in Foil and Saber characterized by a single electrical connection between the wires and the weapon.

12. how heavy is the weight used to test a foil before a bout?

  • 250g
  • 500g
  • 750g
  • 1000g

Explanation: The tip of a foil must be able to support a 500g weight without depressing. This is checked by the referee at the beginning of most tournament bouts.

 

13. When a fencer crosses the line on his end of the field of play with both feet?

  • They are given a red card
  • A point is awarded to their opponent
  • The point is reset to the en garde lines
  • They move two meters forward and fencing starts again

Explanation: If a fencer crosses their own end line with both feet, a touch is awarded to their opponent. This is distinct from a red card, and no cards are given.

 

14. For which weapon is a touch on the foot valid?

  • Foil
  • Saber
  • Epee
  • Rapier

Explanation: In Epee, valid target extends everywhere on the body, including the foot.

 

15. Which of these actions is a second intention action?

  • Feint
  • Fleche
  • Flunge
  • Flick

Explanation: A second intention action indicates a compound action. The first action performed by the fencer is not the one intended to score the touch. Usually a move will be initiated to draw a desired reaction out of the opponent, which the fencer will be ready to counter. A feint draws the reaction of a parry out of the opponent, so the fencer can score a hit in open target.

16. What is a preparation?

  • An offensive movement that resembles an attack to draw a reaction from an opponent
  • An attack that lands before your opponent has started their lunge
  • A small rule violation. A preparation awards a point to the opponent
  • Any action that precedes the actual beginning of the attack

Explanation: Preparation is the term used to describe a fencer’s actions preceding the actual beginning of the attack. This should not be confused with attack-in-preparation, which is when a fencer scores an attack on another fencer while they are in preparation.

 

17. What is the definition of a counter parry?

  • A parry that takes place after a riposte
  • A failed parry
  • A circular parry
  • Hitting the top two-thirds of your opponent’s blade

Explanation: A counter parry is the term that describes a circular parry. It is also used in common vernacular to indicate a parry after a riposte. However, the official term is simply parry, followed by a counter-riposte.

 

18. In Foil and Saber, a simultaneous is when:

  • Two fencers attack at exactly the same time
  • When two fencers are fencing at a distance closer than the length of their weapons
  • Two fencers attack in such a way that the right of way is too close to determine by the referee
  • A parry does not block the opponent’s attack

Explanation: A simultaneous is called when two fencers attack in such a way that the right of way is too close to determine by the referee. This may correspond with two fencers attacking at exactly the same time, however it is not a requirement.

 

19. Which of these does NOT take right-of-way away from your opponents?

  • Lunge
  • Parry
  • Beat
  • Prise-de-Fer

Explanation: A lunge by itself will not give or take away right-of-way, since right of way is determined by who began their attack first (however, if you lunged before your opponent started an attack, it may give you right of way!). All the other actions listed will take right-of-way from your opponent when performed correctly.

 

20. What is the definition of redoublement?

  • A direct attack made after a previous offensive action has failed
  • An indirect attack made after a previous offensive action has failed
  • An attack made after a previous offensive action has failed, directly after a recover into the en guard position
  • Any attack made after a previous offensive action has failed

Explanation: A redoublement is an indirect attack made after a previous offensive action has failed. Here are the full definitions for each redoublement, remise, reprise, and renewal:

Renewal: An additional offensive action made after a previous offensive action has failed. There are three types of renewal: Remise, Reprise, Redoublement.

Redoublement: An additional offensive action made after a previous offensive action has failed. A redoublement is an indirect attack.

Remise: An additional offensive action made after a previous offensive action has failed. A remise is a direct attack.

Reprise: An additional offensive action made after a previous offensive action has failed. A reprise takes place immediately after a recover into the En Garde position.

How did you do? Hungry for more knowledge? Check out our full glossary of fencing terms here.